• Happy Songs

    Pine Belt residents will have the opportunity to hear the choir when members perform at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8, at Good Hope Baptist Church in Purvis.

    The African Children’s Choir is composed of African children, 7 to 10 years old. Many have lost one or both parents through the devastation of war, famine and disease. They represent all the children of a continent and they demonstrate the potential of African children to become strong leaders for a better future in their land.

  • 10 Ways that You Can Better Music

    As 2017 draws to a close, columns will be festooned with lists and accolades. I myself will more than likely compose such a list. However, I can only urge you to read this or anything I write for that matter with two things: An open mind and a discerning ear. The other bombardment we suffer through daily are the traps laid known as "clickbait", where just the simple hook can drag you through a pond of muck you would barely glance at in reality. It is for that reason (and with a great deal of thought), I present this list.

     

  • The Weather Station

    Toronto's Tamara Lindeman is The Weather Station. After listening to her latest Paradise of Bachelors record, it clearly does not matter whether she is/is not or has/has not a band - Lindeman is a brilliant songwriter first and foremost. "The Weather Station" is that rare breakup album that captures the strange optimism of losing your past and the odd comfort of privately reveling in the best parts.

  • HAC Presents A Christmas Concert with Leo Day and Friends

    The Hattiesburg Arts Council looks forward to bringing-in the Christmas season with a concert of carols and holiday songs at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 30, at the Hattiesburg Cultural Center.

  • "Phantom" Set for Southern Miss Stage

    Theater patrons in South Mississippi will soon thrill to another epic production from the team that produced the much-acclaimed Disney and Cameron Mackintosh’s Mary Poppins. Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Phantom of the Opera will take to the stage of the Mannoni Performing Arts Center Auditorium October 26 through November 4, presented by The University of Southern Mississippi School of Music.

  • Pine Belt Pickers

    The deep-seeded roots of countless bands and musical acts can be traced back to the University of Southern Mississippi and the Piney Woods that surround it.

    From Omar and the Howlers and Webb Wilder to Jimmy Buffett, Jeff “Fingers” Taylor, and Tom “Bones” Malone, the Southern Miss community has long served as a breeding ground for musical talent – including Hattiesburg’s own, Pinebelt Pickers.

  • Piney Woods Picnic - Music To Your Ears

    The Piney Woods Picnic, still in its infancy, but growing rapidly each year, was established to create awareness for preservation of the Bouie and Leaf rivers, and the American music deeply rooted in the region right through the “birthplace of rock ‘n’ roll.”

  • Band takes its name from Walt Whitman poem

    When Americana springs to mind, one thinks about those events and ideas that are uniquely American. However, that can be a broad stroke of the pen. Based on the history of this nation, you would think that the songs themselves (not necessarily just their instrumentation) would encourage both examination and conclusion.

  • Putting fun back into learning, playing music

    Learning is not fun. Nine times out of 10, the reason people quit playing an instrument is simply because they’re not having fun. Whether it’s because the songs they’re learning are boring, or because they’re only exposed to theory, unfortunately, many more people attempt to learn an instrument than those who successfully do.

    Some people, specifically husband and wife team Justin and Amie Nunez, are trying to change that.

  • The Potlikker Papers

    In John T. Edge's thoughtful history of Southern food and culture, the former emerges as a lingua franca used to carry the culture of the South all over the world. The Potlikker Papers offers an unobstructed view of the positive and negative events that led the South into its modern appreciation. His years of research and careful attention to detail truly make this book one that needs to be savored like a classic Southern dish.

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