• The Gospel of Brother Dave

    Ever had someone tell you you couldn’t do something and that made you more determined to show them differently and succeed?

    Enter Dave Brandon – everybody’s favorite former End Zone owner, Signature and PineBeltNews delivery man and all-around good guy, whose standard wardrobe consists of khaki cargo shorts, a Hawaiian print short sleeve shirt or short sleeve fishing shirt (of which he has a running ton) in a multitude of colors – and yes, even USM gold. But he is quite dapper when he dresses up, but usually only for special occasions.

  • Meet Your Neighbor: Mary Dryden

    Mary Dryden may be one of the city’s biggest cheerleaders. Whether it’s recycling, litter, the city’s children, education, an art center, preserving architecture, entertainment, Dryden wants the best for her city. For her dedication to the Hub City, Dryden was named Ambassador of the Avenues in 2018 Best of the Pine Belt voting. She’s all about the city – its neighborhoods, diversity, unifying the Hub City’s citizens and making Hattiesburg the best possible place to live.

  • Golden Days in South Mississippi

    Not a graduate of The University of Southern Mississippi, I can’t tell you about my college experiences with the black and gold. My college days would be a snoozer compared to most. But what I can tell you is how wonderful I think this place is that USM and so many other places make their home. 

  • The Art of Ink

    Art is subjective. It comes in many different styles and forms – watercolor, acrylics, pottery, beads and yarn, abstract, realism. And it means something different to each individual who views it. Some may have a Picasso or that of a local artisan hanging in a place of prominence in their home. Others may have a Ferrari or a Nissan parked in their garage. A lady might wear an exquisite piece of jewelry fashioned out of platinum and precious stones or a colorful creation of wire and beads made by a child.

  • Giving style to art

    As a one-time college art major, I understand the style of creations that people consider to be art – from pottery, sculpture, paintings, music, etc.  – whether I agree or not. 

    It’s true that some art looks like you gave paints and a paint brush to a 3-year-old or better yet, strapped a paint brush to a dog’s tail. But it sells for a whole lot more.

    There’s music I don’t care for and some pottery that resembles a sack of potatoes. No, that’s just a concrete piece I had to chisel while at Delta State. 

  • An Interview With Terry Jordan

    With one of the most recognizable smiles in the Pine Belt and an infectious personality to match, Hattiesburg’s Terry Jordan is much more than just a bartender. He is a Renaissance man with a passion for reading, fashion, music, food – and perhaps most importantly, his family.

     

  • From Uganda with Love

    Southern Miss graduate Lindsey Pellittieri sits in her tiny corner of the world in Gulu,Uganda. There have been many life changes since she moved from the Hub City to this rural village halfway across the globe, about 8,000 miles, give or take, and eight hours ahead of local time.

     It’s been a long time since she’s connected with the Hattiesburg area.

    But in this Northern Region village she’s learned not only about her own strengths, but the strength of Ugandan women and others around the world.

    The seed was planted some time ago, but has started to blossom.

  • MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: Rachelle steinhauer

    There are many faces and facets to Rachelle Fortenberry Steinhauer of Hattiesburg. She’s an actress, director, crafter, crocheter, attorney, wife, mother, daughter – and the list goes on.

    And on any given day, there’s a chance she wears several of those hats.

  • MEET YOUR NEIGHBOR: Valerie Cagle

    While Valerie Cagle’s vocation was once hospital administration (she spent 12 years working at the cancer center), her love of the unique has become an avocation and vocation all neatly packaged together.

    That has resulted in her newest venture, The Longleaf Market, located on Hwy. 589 south of Sumrall, not quite six miles from Hwy. 98 in West Hattiesburg.

    Cagle said she enjoys the business set up in what she describes as “the rural hills at the edge of a pasture.”

    “Some have described it as an escape and very peaceful,” she said.

  • Meet the Amays, creators of the hub city cuff

     Robert and Christy Amay have spent the majority of their lives in the jewelry business. So, it only seems natural that one day they’d want to design their own piece of jewelry.

    “We did not just want to make some meaningless piece,” said Christy. “Whatever we made we wanted to be special and one of a kind.”

    That day has come. Enter the Hub City Cuff.

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